UNPLUGGED

Gordon Korman’s newest middle grade adventure has 27 chapters with six different narrators. Multiple viewpoints to the max. It’s a tough task for any author, but this unique plot and setting pulls it all together.

Set in a retreat known as the Oasis, the Arkansas wilderness is the perfect place to put forth a lifestyle of no electronics, eating a vegetarian diet, and meditation. Families come to enrich their lives with a different type of escape from everyday life. The newest arrival is anything but happy to be there. Jett Baranov is the spoiled rich kid of Silicone Valley’s multi-billionaire tech genius. Jett is the focus of the story and narrates 11 of the chapters.

Other’s include:

  • Grace Atwater (6 chapters): She likes the Oasis and adores both the leader and his assistant. Grace is totally into everything they espouse. She detests Jett and his obnoxious ways.
  • Tyrell Karrigan (4 chapters): Allergies abound for this kid as he’s always itchy. His parents and sister have accompanied him on this unique experience and he’s the first to befriend the enemy—Jett.
  • Brooklyn Feldman (4 chapters): She’s spent more time at the Oasis than anyone. She has a secret that is eventually revealed.
  • Brandon Bucholz (1 chapter): Son of a retired pro football player. Brandon is a semi-bully who tries to blackmail Jett.
  • Matt Louganis (1 chapter) Matt is there to chaperone Jett since Jett’s parents have no time for their son. Matt’s task is not easy.

The story’s appeal grows as Jett and three other kids adopt a strange looking lizard found on camp grounds. They keep it in a tray of water, hide the little guy in an abandoned shed, and share the feeding responsibilities. This act of kindness changes many of their attitudes toward each other. Meanwhile, Jett is getting more suspicious of how the camp is conducted. The adults are all acting a little strange. He’ll do anything, no matter how wrong his methods are, to get to the bottom of exactly what is going on.

Recommended for those who enjoy multiple viewpoints, a few laughs, and an easy read.

BOOK BIRTHDAY: January 5, 2021 PAGE COUNT: 336

FIVE MORE THINGS TO LIKE ABOUT: UNPLUGGED by Gordon Korman

  1. Young readers will immediately connect with the concept of going off the grid. No phones or any electronics would be torture to anyone in the ALWAYS ON generation.
  2. An exciting climax with some great character arcs—even the surprising one for Matt.
  3. Having Jett as the center of the story was a good choice. You don’t often see someone whose reputation of being a spoiled jerk as the main protagonist. Jett is the kid nobody wants, but eventually you emphasize with his predicament.
  4. Just enough twists to keep the pages turning. Some were quite unexpected!
  5. The cover pulled me in even before I saw the author’s name.

HOW GORDON KORMAN GOT HIS START

Welcome to the wonderful world of a regular guy who just happened to write 90-something books for kids and teens.

I was born on October 23, 1963 in Montreal, Canada, and grew up mostly in the Toronto area.

My writing career began virtually by accident when I was in 7th grade. The track and field coach had to teach English. For creative writing, he gave us total freedom to work on whatever we wanted for the rest of the year. It was February. That added up to a class period per day for more than four months. The result was my first novel, THIS CAN’T BE HAPPENING AT MACDONALD HALL.

I sent my manuscript to Scholastic because I was the class monitor for Scholastic Book Orders, and figured I was practically an employee. Seriously. (Full disclosure: my mom had to type my book for me.) It was a totally flukey and random way to launch a publishing career, but here’s the thing: It worked.!THIS CAN’T BE HAPPENING AT MACDONALD HALL was published by Scholastic when I was a freshman in high school, and I was on my way.

(Read more about Mr. Korman and his books at his author web site)

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Comments are always welcome and can be typed in below.

Posted in Middle Grade Book Reviews | Tagged , , , , , | 10 Comments

THE STORY OF CLIMATE CHANGE

Climate change is happening all around us and kids of all ages are curious as to what it means. A great place to start is with THE STORY OF CLIMATE CHANGE: A first book about how we can help save our planet.

Filled with colorful illustrations, the journey to understanding begins billions of years ago. This historical approach is a good one as it connects to where we are today.

Text paragraphs interspersed throughout provide a nice balance to the images and help guide the way. The final pages are the most important of all and give advice on what humans can do to solve the climate emergency. A handy glossary wraps things up with definitions to common climate change words like Greenhouse gas and Renewable energy.

The book would be a perfect choice for school and classroom libraries or for your future climate change activist at home. Here’s the official description:

Combining history with science, this book charts the changes in our Earth’s climate, from the beginnings of the planet and its atmosphere, to the Industrial revolution and the dawn of machinery. You’ll learn all about the causes of climate change, such as factory farming and pollution, and the effects that climate change has on humans and animals across the world.
 
As well as discovering the effects of global warming, you’ll discover practical ways we can work together to solve it, from using renewable energy to swapping meat for vegetables in our diet.
 
With fact-packed text by Catherine Barr and vibrant illustrations by Amy Husband and Mike Love, The Story of Climate Change will give you all the information you need, and will inspire you to do your part to fight the climate emergency!

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Blogging about middle grade books or authors next week? Join the celebration.

All you have to do is blog about a middle grade book on a Monday (contests, author interviews, or anything middle grade related also count). Email me the title of the book or feature and a link to your blog at gpcolo[at]gmail[dot]com
Make sure you put MMGM or Marvelous Middle Grade Monday in the subject line so it gets sorted accurately–and please don’t forget to say what book or author you’re featuring) You MUST email me your link by Sunday evening (11 PM Eastern Time) in order to be included in the list of links for the coming Monday.
Thanks for spreading the middle grade love and for being a part of this awesome tradition begun by Shannon Messenger and carried on here at ALWAYS in the MIDDLE! (CLICK HERE FOR PAST MMGM POSTS)
*Please note: these posts are not a reflection of my own opinions on the books featured. Each blogger is responsible for their own MMGM content and I do not pre-screen reviews ahead of time, nor do I control what books they choose. I simply assemble the list based on the links that are emailed to me.
Posted in Middle Grade Book Reviews, non fiction | Tagged , , | 5 Comments

BOTS AND BODS

This illustrated guide explores humans and robots in a variety of ways. We’re both alike and different and we often work together to make life easier and solve problems. Four chapters organize the comparison:

  1. BODY BASICS
  2. GET MOVING
  3. SEEING AND SENSING
  4. THINKING AND FEELING

Each chapter gives readers an depth look at body basics . No worries if you’ve never heard of a hippocampus, dendrites, or an olfactory bulb. The vocabulary is given more meaning through illustrations—an excellent method to retain new learning. You may be surprised how robots are becoming smarter doing a wide variety of tasks.

Twelve challenges labeled THINK ABOUT THIS… ask a variety of questions to test your knowledge. Here’s a sample: What do you think would happen if robots became as smart, or smarter, than humans? And when do you think that will happen? Great inroads to a lively classroom discussion. The author’s answers are provided in the back pages.

Another feature called TRY THIS lets you experiment with some of the principles discussed. Fun and informative.

It’s a fact robots have made life easier for humans. They excel at repetitive tasks and assisting in the medical field, but they don’t do everything better. Our next generation of scientists will be a step ahead by reading this informative guide. BOTS AND BODS is the perfect choice for classrooms and at home. Recommended for ages 8-12.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

John Andrews is a bod, not a bot. He has edited and written dozens of adult and children’s books on history, sports, music, science, and a host of other subjects. His recent published work includes Timeline of World History and The Beautiful Game: The Infographic Book of Soccer.

Posted in Middle Grade Book Reviews, non fiction | Tagged , , | 1 Comment

MMGM for March 22, 2021

                 spring-clip-art-lrg_SPRING

 Click on a flower pot to reach a blogger’s post.

flower2At ALWAYS in the MIDDLE I’m  reviewing a unique story: BLOOM by Nicola Skinner.

flower2June McCrary Jacobs at Reading, Writing, & Stitch-Metic has a S.T.E.A.M. gardening book written by a 12-year-old girl, Gardening with Emma:  Grow and Have Fun, a Kid-to-Kid Guide.

flower2Natalie Aguirre at Literary Rambles interviews debut author Christina Li with a giveaway of her MG contemporary Clues to the Universe.

flower2Faith Hough at Blythe & Bold is back with us again this week and reviews The Hedgehog of Oz, by Cory Leonardo.

flower2Completely Full Bookshelf recommends Fighting Words by Kimberly Brubaker Bradley, and in light of last week’s hate crimes, is also holding the 2021 Books by Asian-American Voices Giveaway!

flower2Patricia Tilton at Children’s Books Heal shares New Handbooks for Teens: Friendship, Hero Journey and Managing Anger. The books include: The Friendship Book, The Hero Handbook, and Zero to 60.

flower2Susan Uhlig was fascinated by Beyond the Bright Sea by Newbery honor author, Lauren Wolk.

flower2Maria Antonia at OF BOOKS, PHOTOGRAPHY, AND TEA features A BOY IS NOT A BIRD by Edeet Ravel.

flower2Rosi Hollinbeck has a review of BLOOD AND GERMS by Gail Jarrow. Rosi also shares three helpful links for her writing friends. Welcome back, Rosi!

flower2Karen Yingling at Ms. Yingling Reads always has a great MMGM review. Check it out along with her other features this past week including her thoughts on SHOE WARS.

If you would like to join in the MMGM fun and get your own spot in the parade, all you have to do is blog about a middle grade book you love on a Monday (contests, author interviews and whatnot also count–but are most definitely not required) and email me the title of the book you’re featuring and a link to your blog at gpcolo (at) gmail (dot) com
(Make sure you put MMGM or Marvelous Middle Grade Monday in the subject line so it gets sorted accurately–and please don’t forget to say what book you’re featuring)
You MUST email me your link by Sunday evening (11 PM Eastern Time) in order to be included in the list of links for the coming Monday.
Thanks for spreading the middle grade love and for being a part of this awesome tradition begun by Shannon Messenger and carried on here at ALWAYS in the MIDDLE! (CLICK HERE FOR PAST MMGM POSTS)
*Please note: these posts are not a reflection of my own opinions on the books featured. Each blogger is responsible for their own MMGM content and I do not pre-screen reviews ahead of time, nor do I control what books they choose. I simply assemble the list based on the links that are emailed to me.
Posted in MMGM Links | Tagged , , | 1 Comment

BLOOM

This import from England is perfect for those looking for something different. A strange malady has hit the town of Little Cherrybliss. Readers are warned they’re already infected just by opening the pages. I pushed on to find out what this was all about.

Long ago the town was a place where beautiful trees and flowers were everywhere. Then a developer decided concrete was the way to go and nature became the loser. Worse yet, no one seems to care.

Leave it to young Sorrel to stumble across a solution. She’s an obedient girl who always does her best job at being good. Trouble begins when Sorrel finds a package of seeds in her backyard and decides to plant them. To say life will never be the same is an understatement. Plants begin to grow out of the heads of both her and best friend, Neena. A few gusts of wind spread the seeds and soon everyone is infected.

The first person narration is heartfelt as Sorrel becomes the most hated and sought after person in England. Tourist traffic is way up, but the citizens want a cure. Or do they? Here’s the official synopsis from Harper Collins:

Sorrel Fallowfield is so good at being good that teachers come to her when they need help remembering the school rules – and there are LOTS.

Luckily, Sorrel doesn’t have any trouble following them, until the day she discovers a faded packet of Surprising Seeds buried under a tree in her backyard.

Now she’s hearing voices, seeing things, experiencing an almost unstoppable urge to plant the Seeds in some very unusual places… and completely failing to win her school’s competition to find The Most Obedient Child of the School.

And all that’s before flowers start growing out of her head…

NORTH AMERICA RELEASE: March 16, 2021 PAGE COUNT: 368

FIVE MORE THINGS TO LIKE ABOUT: BLOOM by Nicola Skinner

  1. Magical realism for sure, but there’s also a welcome focus on contemporary topics like the environment, media presence, and bullying.
  2. Made me want to go outside and plant a few trees.
  3. Friend Neena is a science obsessed researcher and looks at their ordeal like one. Her scientific write-ups soon bring meaning to hypothesizing with facts.
  4. The premise that the book we are reading is the one that came from Sorrel’s notes. It comes full circle from the initial warning to the fulfilling ending.
  5. Nice character arc for Sorrel’s nemesis, the rich and obnoxious Chrissie. She’s a classmate and a descendant of those who wrecked the town.

AUTHOR NICOLA SKINNER’S INSPIRATION FOR BLOOM

Because it was the first book I ever wrote, I sometimes feel like Bloom was thirty years in the making. I poured my entire life into it – from how I felt about school, my love of nature, working in offices, motherhood, and my hopes and fears for my daughter and her generation. Some of my favourite books I read as a child definitely influenced Bloom, especially The Secret Garden, James and The Giant Peach, and Harriet the Spy, with their emphasis, respectively, on nature, mysterious substances that change the world, and what it feels like to become an outcast. (For more visit Nicola’s Author Web Site)

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I received and ARC for my honest review. So far I have nothing but hair on the top of my head so for that I am thankful. Comments are welcome below.

Posted in Middle Grade Book Reviews | Tagged , , , , | 6 Comments

CASEY GRIMES at Trickery School

Against all odds, Casey Grimes is beginning his studies at Trickery School, one of America’s premier monster-control academies. But classes like Extreme Climbing and Land Creature Defense are the least of his worries. He realizes a mysterious enemy is after him-more cunning than a Bog Creep or Hyena Toad. And this secret adversary is playing for keeps.

BOOK BIRTHDAY: 12-1-2020

PAGE COUNT: 286

MY TAKE: Last June I reviewed the first book in this series. CASEY GRIMES The Mostly Invisible Boy. The story continues and the stakes grow even more deadly. Someone is trying to harm Casey and make it permanent. You’ll be guessing who that might be right to the end. My reaction: “Didn’t see that one coming.”

I was drawn into the tension packed plot from the beginning. Characters from the first story return along with an intriguing set of adults and other students.The story likens to the danger and appeal of the Harry Potter series but with a different vibe.

I enjoyed Casey and Gloria, especially their sibling devotion to each other. They have loving parents who are close by when needed. Casey has few friends, but Luci continues to surprise and confuse all at the same time. Her character arc spins out of control but ends up in a nice spot.

The magic is surprising and life saving. Whether the hidden world known as Sylvan Woods really wants magic is central to the plot—The fear of having something invade tradition. The epic climax comes a bit early, leaving the rest of the pages as a set-up for a welcome third book.

Recommended for grades 4 and up, CASEY GRIMES at Trickery School is perfect for adventure lovers. It’s a page-turning feast for the imagination. I wouldn’t mind climbing a few trees, but I’ll leave the schooling adventure to Casey Grimes.

MORE ABOUT THE AUTHOR: AJ Vanderhorst

When I’m not writing, I’m usually fixing my house, coercing—ahem, politely asking my kids to pick up their rooms, or pursuing one of my too-many hobbies. 

These include, but are not limited to:

  • playing basketball
  • gardening
  • hiking
  • evading capture by Jamaican secret agents (long story)
  • making espresso
  • general adventuring
  • reading other people’s books

My wife and I live in a woodsy house with our six proteges and a ridiculous number of pets, including a turtle with a taste for human toes. This makes me an expert on wild, dangerous things—invisibility spells, butcher beasts, hungry kids, you get the idea. (for more visit AJ’s author web site)

I received a digital copy of the book in exchange for my honest review.

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Blogging about middle grade books or authors next week? Join the celebration:

All you have to do is blog about a middle grade book on a Monday (contests, author interviews, or anything middle grade related also count). Email me the title of the book or feature and a link to your blog at gpcolo[at]gmail[dot]com
Make sure you put MMGM or Marvelous Middle Grade Monday in the subject line so it gets sorted accurately–and please don’t forget to say what book or author you’re featuring) You MUST email me your link by Sunday evening (11 PM Eastern Time) in order to be included in the list of links for the coming Monday.
Thanks for spreading the middle grade love and for being a part of this awesome tradition begun by Shannon Messenger and carried on here at ALWAYS in the MIDDLE! (CLICK HERE FOR PAST MMGM POSTS)
*Please note: these posts are not a reflection of my own opinions on the books featured. Each blogger is responsible for their own MMGM content and I do not pre-screen reviews ahead of time, nor do I control what books they choose. I simply assemble the list based on the links that are emailed to me.
Posted in Middle Grade Book Reviews | Tagged , , | 1 Comment

PLANES

I remember the day clearly. It was a Saturday and I ventured out to a little league ball park to watch my 8-year-old nephew play in his first game. He took his position out in left field and sure enough the first batter hit a high fly ball toward him. Like a pro he shielded his eyes with the glove and waited to notch the first out of his young career. His head tilted back and the ball landed 6 feet in front of him. He never saw it coming.

The entire time he was focused on the plane flying overhead. Far more interesting for this pilot to be (Today he flies for American Airlines). And now there’s a book meant for kids like him.

The pages begin with a timeline taking readers from the Wright Flyer in 1903 all the way to a modern day Airbus A-380-800. What follows are four chapters covering all aspects of flight: Airplane Design; Atmosphere and Weather; Communication and Navigation; and The Future of Flight. Interspersed are spotlights on many of the most iconic planes ever made.

PLANES—From The Wright Brothers to the Supersonic Jet is also a visual spectacle with appealing illustrations. My favorite were the four pages covering the parts of an airliner and propeller plane. The hardback is just 104 pages, but the perfect size to lie on your back and read, with occasional glances to the skies above.

The volume is sure to please over and over with frequent re-readings. Perfect as a gift to any youngster interested in the fabulous world of flight.

For more of author/illustrator Jan Van Der Vekan’s books click here.

Posted in Middle Grade Book Reviews, non fiction | Tagged , , | 1 Comment

MMGM for March 15, 2021

                             shamrock-clipart-march-flower-7

 Click on a lucky owl to reach a blogger’s post.

6ip6KGEBTAt ALWAYS in the MIDDLE I’m  reviewing THE SMARTEST KID IN THE UNIVERSE by Chris Grabenstein.

6ip6KGEBTNatalie Aguirre at Literary Rambles has a guest post by debut author Merriam Sarcia Saunders (Trouble With a Tiny t) and her agent Caryn Wiseman. Included are a book and query critique giveaway!

6ip6KGEBTSue Heavenrich at Archimedes Notebook dives into a non-fiction selection, Planet Ocean: Why We All Need a Healthy Ocean by Patricia Newman.

6ip6KGEBTJenni Enzor is back with us again this week and features The Dreaded Cliff by Terry Nichols, including her thoughts on how she developed her characters.

6ip6KGEBTPatricia Tilton at Children’s Books Heal reviews The Ickabog by J.K. Rowling.

6ip6KGEBTMaria Antonia at OF BOOKS, PHOTOGRAPHY, AND TEA features ECHO MOUNTAIN by Lauren Wolk.

6ip6KGEBTStephanie Robinson at Fairday’s Blog has a non-fiction title to share, Bots and Bods: How Robots and Humans Work, From the Inside Out by John Andrews

6ip6KGEBTRosi Hollinbeck is out sick today. You can still send her a get well greeting by visiting her Apologies post.

6ip6KGEBTKaren Yingling at Ms. Yingling Reads always has a great MMGM review. Check it out along with her other features this past week including her thoughts on RED ROVER.

If you would like to join in the MMGM fun and get your own spot in the parade, all you have to do is blog about a middle grade book you love on a Monday (contests, author interviews and whatnot also count–but are most definitely not required) and email me the title of the book you’re featuring and a link to your blog at gpcolo (at) gmail (dot) com
(Make sure you put MMGM or Marvelous Middle Grade Monday in the subject line so it gets sorted accurately–and please don’t forget to say what book you’re featuring)
You MUST email me your link by Sunday evening (11 PM Eastern Time) in order to be included in the list of links for the coming Monday.
Thanks for spreading the middle grade love and for being a part of this awesome tradition begun by Shannon Messenger and carried on here at ALWAYS in the MIDDLE! (CLICK HERE FOR PAST MMGM POSTS)
*Please note: these posts are not a reflection of my own opinions on the books featured. Each blogger is responsible for their own MMGM content and I do not pre-screen reviews ahead of time, nor do I control what books they choose. I simply assemble the list based on the links that are emailed to me.
Posted in MMGM Links | Tagged , , | 1 Comment

THE SMARTEST KID IN THE UNIVERSE

THE OFFICIAL SYNOPSIS: 12 year old Jake’s middle school is about to be shut down. Jake and his friends know their school’s worth saving-if they could only figure out how! When Jake spies a bowl of jellybeans at the hotel where his mom works, he eats them. But uh-oh-those weren’t just jellybeans, one of the scientists at his mom’s conference is in the process of developing the first ingestible information pills. And THAT’S what Jake ate.

Before long, Jake is the smartest kid in the universe. But the pills haven’t been tested yet. And when word gets out about this new genius, people want him. The government. The mega corporations. Not all of them are good people! Can Jake navigate all the ins and outs of his newfound geniusdom (not to mention the ins and outs of middle school!) AND use his smarts to figure out how to save his school? (Hint-it will take someone smart enough to decipher an almost forgotten pirate legend!) It turns out, sometimes even the smartest kid has a lot to learn!

_____________________________________

MY TAKE

The scenario of an instant high IQ would probably never happen, but what fun to go along this genius ride with Jake McQuade. Before eating the jellybeans, Jake enjoys his mediocre lifestyle. He’s definitely not into learning or homework. It’s all about friends and having a good time. When he becomes smart his already smart friends, Kojo and Grace, are astonished at his brain makeover.

Jake joins their Quiz Bowl team and soon discover they are targets. The dishonest principal and her uncle want the school to be closed so they can access the jeweled treasure buried underneath. Having the Quiz Bowl team fail would convince the school board to send the already deteriorating Riverview Middle to the chopping block.

The plot’s fast pace and third person narration takes readers through 70 short chapters. It’s packed with silliness and a typical first crush. Seems Jake’s jelly bean consumption didn’t make him any better at talking to girls.

Strong kid characters and the enticing story line make this a smart choice for Middle grade readers.

BOOK BIRTHDAY: December 1. 2020 PAGE COUNT: 304

FIVE MORE THINGS TO LIKE ABOUT: THE SMARTEST KID IN THE UNIVERSE by Chris Grabenstein

  1. Grace. She’s intelligent and proud of it. Her friendship with Jake was perfectly depicted.
  2. Kojo. He’s also smart and watches a lot of old TV shows like Kojak. That’s a 1970’s drama about a lollypop sucking New York Detective. Kojo mimics his idol with often humorous results. Of course no middle grade student will catch on unless they can find the show via some obscure cable channel.
  3. Included in the back pages are mind bending problems to test your own smarts. They aren’t easy but fun to try.
  4. Mr. Grabenstein has instincts of just what 8-12 year olds need after the year we’ve been through.
  5. I smell a sequel and sure enough there’s one coming this year: GENIUS CAMP.

THE FIRST OF SIX FUN FACTS ABOUT THE SMARTEST KID IN THE UNIVERSE

(To read the other five visit Chris Grabenstein’s author web site)

Guess where I found the inspiration for the character of Jake McQuade, the seventh-grader who ends up as the smartest kid in the universe? That’s right. In a crosswalk at 79th Street and Amsterdam Avenue in New York City. (Wow. You knew that? Have you been eating jelly beans?)

I was out for a walk in my neighborhood and saw an extremely cool, likable kid, probably twelve or thirteen, crossing the street. This guy was so cool, he was chatting with one bud on his cell phone while knocking knuckles with another he passed in the crosswalk.

From that one image, I created a kid who loved going to school — not to learn stuff but to hang out with his friends and to make sure everybody was having a good day. When the story starts, Jake isn’t exactly lazy. He’s just exertion challenged.

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Happy MMGM! Comments are welcome below.

Posted in Middle Grade Book Reviews, New Release | Tagged , , , , | 7 Comments

THE DREADED CLIFF

Flora the packrat doesn’t understand why she’s supposed to avoid the cliff. An adventure leads her to the truth. Along the way surprises abound while encountering other animals: A kangaroo rat, porcupine. cottontail rabbit, great horned owl, and an intimidating gopher snake.

The third person narration stays close to Flora throughout the 37 chapters. Each begins with an excellent illustration of what lies ahead.

The story utilizes accurate details both in the desert setting and the depiction of animal life. I’m not the biggest fan of rats, but Flora’s heartfelt personality won me over. She cares deeply about others, even her enemies.

An excellent bonus awaits readers in the final pages where background information on each animal looks at their unique characteristics. You’ll discover many of the “whys” behind animal behavior.

THE DREADED CLIFF is a perfect addition to any animal lover’s library.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR Terry Nichols is a world traveler who has published over 100 blogs about her experiences abroad. Her thirty-year career as a National Park Service ranger transplanted her from her childhood home in Cincinnati, Ohio to parks in the high desert and canyon country of the Southwest. As a former park ranger, she has written hundreds of trail guides, interpretive brochures, articles, professional papers, teacher guides, and exhibit materials to assist visitors to connect with the diverse human history and plant and animal life of the region. Inspired by a stowaway packrat who hitched a ride in her ’79 Volkswagen van on a camping trip, she wrote her debut middle grade novel, The Dreaded Cliff. Mother of two grown sons, Terry lives in Aztec, New Mexico, where she continues to write and talk to packrats and lizards every chance she gets.

(For more visit Terry’s author website)

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Blogging about middle grade books or authors next week? Join the celebration.

All you have to do is blog about a middle grade book on a Monday (contests, author interviews, or anything middle grade related also count). Email me the title of the book or feature and a link to your blog at gpcolo[at]gmail[dot]com
Make sure you put MMGM or Marvelous Middle Grade Monday in the subject line so it gets sorted accurately–and please don’t forget to say what book or author you’re featuring) You MUST email me your link by Sunday evening (11 PM Eastern Time) in order to be included in the list of links for the coming Monday.
Thanks for spreading the middle grade love and for being a part of this awesome tradition begun by Shannon Messenger and carried on here at ALWAYS in the MIDDLE! (CLICK HERE FOR PAST MMGM POSTS)
*Please note: these posts are not a reflection of my own opinions on the books featured. Each blogger is responsible for their own MMGM content and I do not pre-screen reviews ahead of time, nor do I control what books they choose. I simply assemble the list based on the links that are emailed to me.
Posted in Middle Grade Book Reviews | Tagged , , | 2 Comments